Fascinating photos of Nigeria taken 65 years ago

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  • Fascinating photographs of 1930s Nigeria show the country in decades before its independence from Britain
  • Were taken by Edward Harland Duckworth who served as Inspector of Education in Nigeria from 1930 to 1944
  • After more than 65 years, the photos have now emerged for auction and are tipped to sell for around £1,000
  • There are images of natives farming the land, science lessons, dancing children and men in military formation

The images were captured by Edward Harland Duckworth, who served as Inspector of Education in Nigeria from 1930 to 1944, and collated into a photo album by his friend Henry Svory, who was a head of department at Ibadan University at that time.

They provide an insight into the lives of the native population in the West African country in the decades preceding its independence from Britain in 1960.

Fascinating photographs of 1930s Nigeria taken before its independence from Britain have been unearthed after more than 65 years. This image shows a group of students in a science class learning about the human skeleton from their teacherFascinating photographs of 1930s Nigeria taken before its independence from Britain have been unearthed after more than 65 years. This image shows a group of students in a science class learning about the human skeleton from their teacher

Fascinating photographs of 1930s Nigeria taken before its independence from Britain have been unearthed after more than 65 years. This image shows a group of students in a science class learning about the human skeleton from their teacher

The images provide an insight into the lives of the native population before Nigeria's independence. One shows several men in military formation holding gunsThe images provide an insight into the lives of the native population before Nigeria's independence. One shows several men in military formation holding guns
Another is a bizarre image of a man stood next to a giant fishAnother is a bizarre image of a man stood next to a giant fish

The images provide an insight into the lives of the native population before Nigeria’s independence. One shows several men in military formation holding guns (pictured left) and another is a bizarre image of a man stood next to a giant fish (right)

This image shows a group of children dressed in costumes and masks and playing musical instruments while others watch onThis image shows a group of children dressed in costumes and masks and playing musical instruments while others watch on

This image shows a group of children dressed in costumes and masks and playing musical instruments while others watch on

After more than 65 years, the photos, which have remained in Savory’s family, have now emerged for auction and are tipped to sell for £1,000.

One photograph shows a group of young men bathing in the Kurama Waters while others capture pyramids of groundnut sacks and a bustling cloth market.

There are images of students in a science class and an intake celebrating their graduation.

Several of the photos illustrate the Western influence in the country at that time with goods being disembarked off a plane and a European car next to an ancient settlement.

There are images of natives farming the land and others in military formation holding guns.

Photos of canoeists on the water and natives on horseback also feature in the collection.

One photograph shows a group of young men bathing in the Kurama Waters (pictured) while others capture pyramids of groundnut sacks and a bustling cloth marketOne photograph shows a group of young men bathing in the Kurama Waters (pictured) while others capture pyramids of groundnut sacks and a bustling cloth market

One photograph shows a group of young men bathing in the Kurama Waters (pictured) while others capture pyramids of groundnut sacks and a bustling cloth market

Two donkeys are pictured loaded up with a rather hefty load of crates in the West African country more than 65 years agoTwo donkeys are pictured loaded up with a rather hefty load of crates in the West African country more than 65 years ago

Two donkeys are pictured loaded up with a rather hefty load of crates in the West African country more than 65 years ago

Another picture shows two men reading a book, one appearing to teach the otherAnother picture shows two men reading a book, one appearing to teach the other
A boy stands with a makeshift pick axe as a man makes something in front of himA boy stands with a makeshift pick axe as a man makes something in front of him

Another picture shows two men reading a book, one appearing to teach the other (left), while a boy stands with a makeshift pick axe as a man makes something in front of him (right)

Posing for the camera: A Nigerian man stops maintenance works on a train to look at Edward Harland Duckworth's cameraPosing for the camera: A Nigerian man stops maintenance works on a train to look at Edward Harland Duckworth's camera

Posing for the camera: A Nigerian man stops maintenance works on a train to look at Edward Harland Duckworth’s camera

HISTORY OF BRITAIN’S COLONIAL RULE IN NIGERIA

Britain’s colonial rule in Nigeria lasted for 60 years, a period which saw the spread of Western education, the English language and Christianity.

New forms of money, transportation and communication were developed, with the country formally united as the Colony and Protectorate of Nigeria in 1914.

Two tiers of government emerged, central and local. The central government was presided over by the governor-general and accountable to the secretary for the colonies in London. It was more powerful but distant from the people.

To prevent any united opposition to its authority, the British also adopted a divide-and-rule policy, keeping Nigerian groups separate from one another as much as possible.

After the 1930s, political activities focused primarily on ways to end British rule. A national party, the Nigerian Youth Movement, emerged in 1934, around the time these photos were taken, and its members won elections to the Legislative Council. After 1940, political activities were broadened to include more people.

Following the Second World War, and in response to the growth of Nigerian nationalism and demands for independence, successive constitutions legislated by the British Government moved the country toward self-governance.

Then, with the wave of independence sweeping across Africa, Britain agreed on October 27, 1958 that Nigeria would become an independent state on October 1 1960.

                                                                                                                                                                                                      Source: Britannica.com

The diverse selection even includes one of a young football team from 1947 and a bizarre image of a man stood next to a giant fish.

Mimi Connell-Lay, cataloguer at David Lay auctioneers who are auctioning off the photos, said: ‘The bulk of the photos were taken by Duckworth and the photo album belonged to his great friend Savory who he knew from their time in Nigeria.

‘Duckworth was desperate to preserve and promote Nigerian art and the antiquities and when he finished as a minister he became a magazine editor.

‘It is a relative of Savory who has decided to put them up for auction.

‘Interesting historical photos like these have quite a value in them.

‘Duckworth was obviously a very good photographer and the result is a series of good quality, dramatic images from a part of the world we don’t know a lot about.

Several of the photos illustrate the Western influence in the country at that time with goods being disembarked off a plane (pictured) and a European car next to an ancient settlementSeveral of the photos illustrate the Western influence in the country at that time with goods being disembarked off a plane (pictured) and a European car next to an ancient settlement

Several of the photos illustrate the Western influence in the country at that time with goods being disembarked off a plane (pictured) and a European car next to an ancient settlement

The diverse selection of photos taken by a high-ranking education inspector include one of a young football team from 1947The diverse selection of photos taken by a high-ranking education inspector include one of a young football team from 1947

The diverse selection of photos taken by a high-ranking education inspector include one of a young football team from 1947

As well as an image of students in a science class there is also a photograph of an intake celebrating their graduationAs well as an image of students in a science class there is also a photograph of an intake celebrating their graduation

As well as an image of students in a science class there is also a photograph of an intake celebrating their graduation

There are images of natives farming the land and others from Nigeria in military formation holding guns (pictured)There are images of natives farming the land and others from Nigeria in military formation holding guns (pictured)

There are images of natives farming the land and others from Nigeria in military formation holding guns (pictured)

‘We may be aware of what the British were getting up to in Nigeria but much less about the lives of the native people.’

Duckworth served with the Royal Engineers during the First World War before embarking on a stellar academic career which culminated in him being named Inspector of Education in Nigeria in 1930.

In 1944 the post of Inspector of Education was abolished and Duckworth became editor of Nigeria Magazine.

In this post he fought for the recognition of Nigerian arts and crafts, the establishment of museums and the preservation of ‘antiquities’ and more accessible education.

He retired in 1953 and went to live with his sister in Cheltenham. He died in January 1972.

The British fought several wars in the late 19th and early 20th century as they sought to gain control over the independent kingdoms of Nigeria.

The aftermath of the Second World War saw the growth of Nigerian nationalism and Nigeria achieved independence in 1960.

The auction takes place tomorrow.

A man looks through what appears to be a camera on a tripodA man looks through what appears to be a camera on a tripod
Canoeists on the waterCanoeists on the water

Photos of canoeists on the water (right), natives on horseback and a man with a tripod (left) also feature in the collection

Several of the photos illustrate the Western influence in Nigeria at the time with a European car next to an ancient settlementSeveral of the photos illustrate the Western influence in Nigeria at the time with a European car next to an ancient settlement

Several of the photos illustrate the Western influence in Nigeria at the time with a European car next to an ancient settlement

The images were captured by Edward Harland Duckworth, who served as Inspector of Education in Nigeria from 1930 to 1944, and collated into an album by his friend Henry Svory. This picture shows a group of men outside an ancient settlementThe images were captured by Edward Harland Duckworth, who served as Inspector of Education in Nigeria from 1930 to 1944, and collated into an album by his friend Henry Svory. This picture shows a group of men outside an ancient settlement

The images were captured by Edward Harland Duckworth, who served as Inspector of Education in Nigeria from 1930 to 1944, and collated into an album by his friend Henry Svory. This picture shows a group of men outside an ancient settlement

The fascinating collection includes a bustling market where a train has stopped, showing people milling around nearbyThe fascinating collection includes a bustling market where a train has stopped, showing people milling around nearby

The fascinating collection includes a bustling market where a train has stopped, showing people milling around nearby

 Source: dailymail.co.uk

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